Libraries Support Digital Readiness with Tech Training, STEM Programs, More Robust Online Collections

Leading Role Recognized in Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

Nearly 100 percent of America’s public libraries offer workforce development training programs, online job resources, and technology skills training, according to a new study from the American Library Association (ALA). Combined with maker spaces, coding classes, and programs dedicated to entrepreneurship and small business development, libraries are equipping U.S. communities with the resources and skills needed to succeed in today’s – and tomorrow’s – global marketplace.

President Obama and Congress recently acknowledged the vital contributions of libraries by enabling them—for the first time—to be considered One-Stop partners and eligible for federal funding to support job training and job search programs. The bipartisan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act also authorizes adult education and literacy activities provided by public libraries as an allowable statewide employment and training activity.

“Senator Jack Reed and I led the effort to include public libraries in this important new law because they are often the first places Americans go for skill development and job search assistance,” said Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ). “I’ve seen this firsthand with NJWorks@yourlibraryproject, which used federal Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) funding to help get job seekers back to work with access to online job resources and training in every community in New Jersey.”
Overall, libraries report technology improvements—including nearly ubiquitous public wi-fi, growing mobile resources and a leap in e-book access—but the ALA’s 2014 Digital Inclusion Survey also documents digital differences among states and an urban/rural divide.

“Until the Digital Inclusion Survey, no national study has shown in such detail the extent to which libraries complete education, jumpstart employment and entrepreneurship, and foster individual empowerment and engagement, or the E’s of Libraries™,” said ALA President Courtney Young. “The study also begins to map new programs and technology resources that range from STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) maker programming to 3D printing to hackathons.”

Among the study findings:
*98% of libraries provide free public access to Wi-Fi, up from 89% in 2012;
*98% provide technology training, ranging from internet safety and privacy to coding to using social media;
*98% provide assistance completing online government forms;
*97% provide online homework help;
*95% offer workforce development training programs;
*90% offer e-books, up from 76% in 2012;
*56% offer health and wellness programs regarding developing healthy lifestyles;
*50% offer entrepreneurship and small business development programs; and
*Average number of computers provided by libraries is now 20, up from 16 in 2012

“Changes in technology—whether internet speeds, or new devices or new applications—are racing faster all the time,” said IMLS Director Susan Hildreth. “Libraries are ideally positioned to help everyone in our communities get up to speed. This is the heart of digital inclusion—equitable access to internet-connected devices and online content plus the skills to take advantage of the educational, economic and social opportunities available through these technologies.”

Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and managed by the ALA Office for Research & Statistics and the Information Policy and Access Center at the University of Maryland, the Digital Inclusion Study provides national- and state-level data. The International City/County Management Association and ALA Office for Information Technology Policy are partners in the research effort.

While most libraries marked progress from the last national library technology study in 2012, advances are uneven. Less than half of rural libraries reported they increased bandwidth speeds in the last 24 months, compared with 64 percent of urban libraries and 56 percent of suburban libraries. Fewer than two-thirds of rural libraries report having access to information technology (IT) staff, far behind their counterparts. A vast majority of all libraries (66 percent), though, agree they would like to increase their broadband capacity, and that cost is the leading barrier to doing so.

“It is increasingly understood that access to broadband is the critical success factor across our society, and we must do more to connect all of our communities,” said ICMA Executive Director Robert J. O’Neill, Jr. “Libraries play an essential role in helping local governments meet their greatest challenges by connecting their services to critical community priorities.”

The study provides a first national look at emerging trends, from STEM maker spaces (17 percent, or about 3,000 libraries), to wireless printing (33 percent) to 3D printers and hosting hackathons or other coding/application development events (about 2 percent each, or roughly 260 libraries). Creation and making activities already are transforming what is possible for communities through libraries. At the Johnson County Library in Kansas, for instance, a library patron printed a mechanical hand for a family friend. High school student Mason Wilde loaded needed blueprints onto library computers and used the library’s 3D printer to create the necessary parts. Wilde then decided to start a nonprofit to make 3D prosthetics for other children, and he is now considering a career in the biomedical field.

“Creating is becoming a new digital competency, and libraries are building and expanding their programs and services to meet these changing community needs,” said Ann Joslin, President of the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies. Joslin also is the state librarian in Idaho, which currently has a pilot program underway to support library maker activities and encourage the use of new technologies and tools.

“Whether it’s a class on internet safety, an entrepreneur who identifies potential customers from databases or a class on digital content creation, libraries continue to establish themselves as digital leaders in communities,” Young concluded. “This study demonstrates how technology investments benefit our libraries and our patrons, and keep our communities thriving.”

Methodology: The Digital Inclusion Survey collected data from a nationally representative sample of public libraries at the branch/outlet level between September 3 and November 30, 2013. The survey was open to all public libraries to participate. However, the analysis conducted used only sampled libraries. The survey received 3,392 responses, for a 70.1 percent response rate. For more information, please visit http://www.ala.org/research/digitalinclusion and http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/. Past related reports on public library technology are available at www.ala.org/plinternetfunding.

ASCLA seeks online course and webinar proposals through September 1, 2015

ASCLA encourages subject matter experts and experienced librarians to submit proposals for ASCLA webinars to be presented October 2014 through August 2015. 

Proposals must be submitted by September 1, 2014 for presentation October 2014 through August 2015. Online courses and webinars submitted during this open call period will be reviewed and approved by September 15, 2015.

ASCLA welcomes proposals on topics that will assist our diverse membership in improved service delivery and job performance. ASCLA’s members represent libraries serving special populations, including library users with disabilities, and adults and youth who are incarcerated or detained; independent librarians and consultants; state library agencies and their employees, public libraries serving or working with the previously cited populations and institutions; and library networks and cooperatives. Staff of these libraries and agencies include librarians, library paraprofessionals, and library support staff.

The online course proposal form can be accessed here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/asclaonlinecourse2015

Attendees are charged a fee to participate in the course and receive a certificate upon completion. The fee includes ongoing access to an archived version of the course. Instructors will be paid a one-time course/curriculum development fee of $1,000 to set up the course initially, and $40 per participant thereafter.

The webinar proposal form can be accessed here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/asclawebinar2015 .
Webinar presenters will be paid $150 for each webinar presented and will receive training and support for Adobe Connect, the webinar technology platform used by the division. Webinars are generally 1-1 ½ hours long.

Proposal topics for online learning and webinars may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • ADA updates for libraries
  • Adult programming in a correctional library
  • Basics of a good prison/jail library
  • Best practices in correctional librarianship and providing services to the incarcerated
  • Consulting: marketing your services
  • Demonstration and review of current accessibility products
  • Ebooks
  • Emerging technologies in accessibility products and services, including screen readers, mobile devices, IPADS, etc.
  • Evaluating and improving cooperative services;
  • Future trends in library service;
  • Grants: best practices for finding funding and writing proposals
  • Group purchasing best practices
  • Hiring library consultants: best practices
  • How to be a futurist
  • Marketing library services to people with disabilities
  • Marketing on a shoestring budget
  • New apps that assist library users with special needs
  • Providing library services to people with cognitive or mental impairments
  • Review of best practices, standards and guidelines to improve library services
  • Technology trends for people with disabilities

Questions about submissions or about ASCLA’s online learning and webinar programs may be sent to Andrea Hill, ASCLA web manager and online learning liaison at ahill@ala.org.

ASCLA Seeks Editor for Online Membership Journal: Interface

The Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) seeks an editor for its quarterly online membership journal InterfaceInterface serves as a critically-important source of information and communication, reaching ASCLA’s 800 members each quarter and sharing news and best practices in ASCLA’s areas of interest with the larger library and user community.  Guided by ASCLA editorial policy, the editor is responsible for the content, format, and timely publication of Interface.

Applicants should have a strong overall knowledge of the association and its goals and have an interest in and knowledge of issues relevant to ASCLA members.  Applicants must have written and published articles and/or have demonstrated editorial experience.  Preferred applicants will have experience or familiarity with the technical and editorial issues associated with electronic and Web publishing.

Compensation of up to $1,000 annually will be provided to the Interface editor to cover travel to ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meeting.   The editor also receives complimentary registration for both conferences and VIP early registration for hotels.

The two-year appointment as Interface editor will begin upon appointment and end at the conclusion of the Annual Conference in 2016.  The term is renewable upon approval of the ASCLA Board. 

The deadline for application is July 10, 2014. It is anticipated a candidate will be selected by mid-August.  

Applicants should email a resume and cover letter summarizing their editorial philosophy, two to four samples of written work or editorial activities, and contact information for two professional references to Susan Hornung, ASCLA Executive Director: shornung@ala.org.

A division of the American Library Association, ASCLA enhances the effectiveness of library service by providing networking, enrichment and educational opportunities for its diverse members, who represent state library agencies, libraries serving special populations, consortia, and consultants. ASCLA is a division of the American Library Association. For more information, visit www.ala.org/ascla.

Job Description: ASCLA Interface Editor

 

Reports to Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) Board 
Term 2-year appointment, from the end of ALA 2014 Annual Conference through 2016 Annual Conference. The Editor is appointed by the ASCLA Board; the term is renewable upon approval of the Board. The Editor must be a member of ASCLA. 
Summary of Position
  • Interface is the official newsletter of the ASCLA. It supports effective communication by reporting official acts and activities of the units of ASCLA, disseminating substantive articles and special focus issues on latest developments in the fields of interest to ASCLA members, and serving as a communication channel to the broader library and user community.
  • Guided by the editorial policy approved by the ASCLA Board, the editor is responsible for the content, format, and timely publication of Interface and prepares an annual plan indicating topics to be addressed in quarterly issues.
  • The Publications Committee serves in an advisory capacity to the editor and develops guidelines to assist the editor.

 

Specific Responsibilities
  • Establish the annual schedule in consultation with the ASCLA Executive Director and share content deadlines with the ASCLA President and members of the Board, committee chairs, and interest group leaders.
  • Establish a theme for each quarterly issue of Interface, based on regular communication with ASCLA members, section leaders, Board, committees, and staff, breaking news, and activities of interest.
  • Invite articles related to the theme, through personal invitation to a few key authors and through general announcement using the ASCLA listservs and others as appropriate.
  • Gather articles for quarterly publication.
  • Collect signed copyright release forms from each author.
  • Work closely with the ASCLA office to incorporate articles submitted by staff.
  • Edit articles for content, style, and correct grammatical usage, consulting with other experts as needed. The ASCLA Publications Committee serves as an unofficial editorial board, and section leaders and ASCLA Board members are always willing to provide advice and counsel in their areas of expertise.
  • Prepare each issue for posting to the ASCLA website and submit files via e-mail to the ASCLA office.
  • Attend ASCLA Board meetings at ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meetings as non-voting ex-officio member, and attend as many interest group and committee meetings, programs, and other ASCLA-related events as possible.
  • Periodically survey members to determine their satisfaction with Interface and elicit ideas for improvement.
  • Occasionally handle requests for republication and resolve problems.

 

Honoraria ASCLA contributes $1,000 per year to help offset the conference expenses of the Interface editor. In addition the Interface editor receives complimentary registration for both conferences and VIP early registration for hotels.

 

 

IFLA Manifesto for libraries serving persons with a print disability

To improve and promote accessible library and information services to persons with a visual impairment or any other print disability

Lack of access to information is the biggest barrier for persons with a print disability to fully and effectively participate in all aspects of society.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (esp. art. 9, 21 and 24) states that print disabled people have the right to equal access to books, knowledge and information at the same time, cost and quality as everyone else.

There are over 161 million blind and partially sighted people in the world and this number is growing. There are even more people with other print disabilities who cannot effectively read print because of a physical, perceptual, developmental, cognitive, or learning disability. Together this makes up a very large number of people who cannot read a conventional book, magazine or website. Less than 5% of all published materials and reportedly less than 20% of websites are accessible to this target group.

Libraries are a community’s ‘portal’ to information, knowledge and leisure, and their services need to be made accessible for all. Content and technology providers are essential partners in developing these inclusive information and leisure reading services. They should do so by making good use of the emerging possibilities of digitised publishing and delivery.

Statements

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) promotes the right of people with a print disability to equitable access to all library and information services and supports international and territorial legislation that fights disability discrimination

  1. IFLA recommends that all library and information providers, as part of their core services, put in place services, collections, equipment and facilities, which will assist individual users with a print disability to access and use resources that meet their particular needs for information.
  2. IFLA encourages library and information service providers to consult individuals with a disability, and groups representing them, in the planning, development and ongoing delivery of services.
  3. IFLA acknowledges that the best services are provided by professionals who are aware of the needs of, and service options for, people with a print disability. Therefore IFLA encourages all library and information services to ensure that staff are adequately trained and available to work with users with a print disability, and supports career-long professional development and formal library and information studies programs, which will facilitate the strengthening of equitable library and information services to people with a print disability.
  4. IFLA supports efforts to improve access to resources by people with a print disability through service agreements, referrals and sharing of resources between library and information services; and between these and other organisations specialising in services targeted for people with a print disability.

Therefore IFLA encourages the establishment and development of an international network of libraries of accessible materials.

  1. IFLA supports efforts to ensure that copyright legislation enables equal access by people with a print disability to information from all libraries and information providers
  2. In addition to meeting legislative requirements, IFLA encourages the observation of universal design principles, guidelines and standards to ensure that library and information services, collections, technologies, equipment and facilities meet the identified needs of users with a print disability.

Implementing

To promote the implementation of the statements in this document, IFLA encourages:

  • Decision makers at international, national and local levels to continuously develop and execute action plans for library and information services to persons with a print disability
  • Decision makers at international, national and local levels to include in their action plans mechanisms for (self) monitoring the progress made on the implementation
  • All funding bodies to adequately resource library and information services for persons with a print disability

Endorsed by the IFLA Governing Board April 2012

ASCLA President’s Program at ALA Annual Conference 2014!

Connected Learning and Libraries: At the Intersection of the Arts, Media, New Technologies, and Informal Learning.

Sunday, June 29, 10:30am – 12:00pm, Las Vegas Convention Center, Rooms N255/257

Connected Learning is an exciting educational approach that is attracting increasing attention from educators, librarians, foundations, and governments. It makes learning relevant to all populations, to real life and real work, and to the realities of the digital age where the demand for learning never stops. Join Kylie Peppler, Advisor to the Connected Learning Research Network, to learn more about the connected learning approach, underlying research, and how it can be successfully leveraged in the design of library spaces and programming targeted at today’s youth.

Speaker: Kylie Peppler, Assistant Professor, Learning Sciences Program, Indiana University, Bloomington

Kylie Peppler, an artist by training, engages in research that focuses on the intersection of arts, media, new technologies, and informal learning. Currently, Peppler’s work examines the media arts practices of urban and rural youth and youth with disabilities in order to support literacy, learning, and the arts in the 21st Century. An Advisor for the Connected Learning Research Network, Peppler has also conducted research on media arts in youth communities for the National Science Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Initiative.

Free to all conference registrants

 Add to my Conference Schedule

Summer 2014 Interface Available Now!

The new issue of Interface, ASCLA’s quarterly newsletter, is available online now! This issue includes all sorts of relevant information about upcoming events, a recap of ASCLA’s Annual Conference experience, and news from a variety of ASCLA’s interest groups. Access the new issue here.

Interested in submitting an article for publication in the next issue? We welcome articles that cover human interest stories, highlight successful programs or projects, discuss the implementation of workplace and library improvements, cover news from our member interest groups, and just about anything else that you’d like to share with your ASCLA colleagues.

Submissions and inquiries can be sent to Anne Abate, Interface editor, at anne@librarydiscountnetwork.com.

ASCLA’s ALA Annual Conference Highlights!

Stay up-to-date with ASCLA on Twitter  Facebook and stay informed about the ALA Annual Conference at #alaac14

Advanced Registration ends June 20th!

REGISTER for ALA Annual Conference NOW!

ASCLA’s ALA Annual Conference Highlights: *Free to all conference registrants!

ASCLA 101

Join ASCLA as we host our first ASLCA 101, Networking and orientation event. 
Interested, new and current members are welcome. Brief presentation about ASCLA,

networking opportunities, refreshments and raffle prizes! Read more  Add to my schedule

Free to all conference registrants!

ASCLA / COSLA Reception and Award Presentation

Each year, ASCLA honors professional achievement in the areas of work represented by our diverse membership. From awards recognizing projects for services to people with disabilities to citations for service to ASCLA…Read more  Add to my schedule

ASCLA President’s Program 

Connected Learning and Libraries: At the Intersection of the Arts,

Media, New Technologies, and Informal Learning.

Connected Learning is the progressive educational approach intended for our continuously changing world. Read more  Add this to my schedule

Free to all conference registrants!   

Exclusive and Valuable ASCLA Programs

Saturday

Accessible eBooks: Ensuring that Your Library’s eContent is Universally Accessible to All 
As libraries purchase an ever increasing amount of electronic content, questions about universal accessibility become even more important. Read more  Add to my schedule

Whither Library Consortia? 

Based on research for a forthcoming book on library consortia, our co-presenters will discuss changes in the landscape of consortia, e.g., funding, membership, and services as well as innovations designed to add value to membership and enhance the sustainability of consortia.

Read more  Add to my schedule

Creating Fun, Accessible Programming for Youth with Disabilities 
Youth patrons with disabilities are members of every public library’s population. This presentation will review best practices on accessible, engaging and entertaining programs for children of all ages and abilities. Read more  Add to my schedule 

Consulting After Retirement:  Is it Right For You? 
Thinking of retiring?  Want to utilize your skills and expertise on a part-time per project basis?  Is being a library consultant the right career path for you?  Read more  Add to my schedule

Online Inside: Justification, Issues and Solutions for Digital Literacy in Correctional Settings 

Now more than ever individuals housed in US prisons need to be digitally literate if we want to increase their chances of successfully transitioning back into the community. Panelists will discuss the obstacles and talk about what is being done to expose people in prison to the tools they will need for job searching, health and social services, etc. Read more  Add to my schedule

Free and Affordable Apps for Accessibility 

Free and low cost applications for smart phones and tablets have gone beyond simply games and utility functions and can be used to increase accessibility for library patrons of all ages.   Read more  Add to my schedule

Creative Collaborations:  Successful Partnerships that Serve Children with Autism 
Our panel will feature librarians who forged partnerships with outside organizations in order to serve their young patrons with autism in new and exciting ways. Read more  Add to my schedule

Embedding Librarians in Virtual Communities 

This program will share examples of embedding librarianship through MOOCs, wikis, mobile devices, and virtual worlds on an international scale.  Read more  Add to my schedule

Teen Reading Lounge: Engaging Teens through Interactive Humanities based Programming 
Teen Reading Lounge, an interactive book discussion series created by Pennsylvania Humanities Council (PHC) for public libraries to encourage teens to read and talk about literature that matters to them… Read more  Add to my schedule

Temporary Staffing Solutions for Libraries:  A Consortial Approach in Massachusetts 
Libraries in Massachusetts needed assistance meeting short-term staffing needs, while library workers wanted opportunities to earn income, gain experience, and stay connected to the field during unemployment or retirement. The Massachusetts Library System recognized a potential solution that could also generate additional revenue for our collaborative: a temporary library staffing service.  Read more  Add to my schedule

Monday

Tour of Summit View Juvenile Correctional Center Library *Ticketed Event
Experience this unique, exciting, and challenging arena of library services on a tour of the newly re-opened Summit View Youth Correctional Center in Las Vegas. Read more Add to my schedule

Learn more about how, for less than $5 a month plus the cost of ALA membership, can benefit you professionally and personally.
Become a member now at http://www.ala.org/membership or by calling 1-800-545-2433, option 5.

Register for the 2014 ALA Annual Conference here!

In the Margins Book Award and Selection Committee, Names its First Top 10 Titles!

In the Margins Book Award and Selection Committee, (ITM) a committee under the umbrella of ASCLA’s Library Services for Youth in Custody (LYSC) Interest Group, selected their first list of 25 titles and a top 10.  In the Margins strives to find the best books for teens living in poverty, on the streets, in custody – or a cycle of all three.

The 2014 top ten are:

  • Asante, M.K. Buck: a Memoir. Spiegel & Grau. August 2013. 272p. HC $25.00. ISBN 9780812993417.
  • Jones, Marilyn Denise. From Crack to College and Vice Versa. Marilyn D. Jones. May 2013. 105p. PB $14.95. ISBN 9780989427401.
  • Langan, Paul.  Survivor. Townsend Press. January 2013. 138p. PB $5.95. ISBN 9781591943044.
  • McKay, Sharon E. War Brothers: The Graphic Novel. Illustrated by Lafance, Daniel.  Annick Press. February 2013. PB $18.95. ISBN 9781554514885.
  • McVoy, Terra Elan. Criminal.  Simon Pulse. May, 2013. 288p. HC $16.99. ISBN 9781442421622.
  • Medina, Meg. Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass. Candlewick. March 2013. 260p. HC $16.99. ISBN 9780763658595.
  • Nussbaum, Susan. Good Kings, Bad Kings. Algonquin Books. November 2013. 304p. PB $14.95.  ISBN 9781616203252.
  • Rivera, Jeff. No Matter What. CreateSpace. October 2013. 112p. PB $5.38. ISBN 9781493544141.
  • Ryan, Darlene. Pieces of Me. Orca Book Publishers. September 2012. 240p. PB $12.95. ISBN 9781459800809.
  • Young, Pamela Samuels. Anybody’s Daughter. Goldman House Publishing.  October 2013. 374p. PB $16.99. ISBN 9780989293501.

“We are pleased with the founding of this list and our efforts of the first year. We have a great list, bringing to national attention books that are new finds and not widely publicized in the library world along with standout books of the year” said Amy Cheney, chair of In the Margins Book Award and Selection committee. “The committee is excited to share these books with you for teens living and interested in the margins of society.”

The full list of 25 titles with annotations and more information on the committee, selections, and process can be found at:

http://www.youthlibraries.org/margins-committee

USA FREEDOM Act floor vote this week; call your rep. now!

The “USA FREEDOM Act” (H.R. 3361) is now poised for a vote by the full House of Representatives on or about Wednesday, May 21st, barely two weeks since a deal was struck by their Chairmen to spring a new version from the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees. As reported in District Dispatch on May 8, while the Committees’ new version of H.R. 3361 doesn’t make all of the changes in current law that ALA and other civil liberties advocates believe necessary to fully protect the American public’s privacy, it does take the important step of ending the “bulk collection” of telephone record data so sensationally disclosed in the press over the past year.

Before reaching the House floor, however, H.R. 3361, must first be considered by the powerful Rules Committee. Sources say that it is likely to make further changes in the bill, including some that could weaken the public protections afforded by the current Judiciary/Intelligence version of the bill. As always, the Rules Committee also will decide what further amendments to the legislation — if any — will be in order when the bill reaches the floor and all other terms of the floor debate.

Together with 32 of its library and other coalition partners, ALA wrote last week to all key House leaders and Members urging them to strengthen and clarify the Judiciary/Intelligence version of H.R. 3361 in the Rules Committee . . . and endorsing Congressional adoption of critical further privacy protections. The most sweeping of those recommendations are not likely to be accepted and included in the Rules Committee’s version of the bill that the full House will consider. The odds are good, however, that vital corrections urged by ALA and others will be made to assure that, at minimum, the USA FREEDOM Act will truly end the bulk collection of telephone data as Congress says it intends.

NOW is the time for all ALA members, friends, supporters and privacy protectors of all kinds to contact their Representatives in the House! Use the fast and friendly tools at ALA’s Legislative Action Center to easily find your Member of Congress and to tell him or her:

  1. correct and strengthen HR 3361 as recommended by ALA and its coalition partners in their joint letter to assure that it really will end bulk telephone data collection;
  2. don’t water the bill down by weakening key protections now in the bill; and
  3. pass more legislation later this year to restore the right legal balance between guarding our liberty and our security.

 

You are cordially invited to the ASCLA/COSLA Reception and Awards Presentation!

All conference attendees are invited!    Add to my conference

Saturday, June 28, 5:45 PM – 7:00 PM 
Pavilion 04 of the Las Vegas Hotel. 
The following recipients will be honored:

Greenville County Library System (S.C.) is the winner of the ASCLA/Keystone Library Automation System (KLAS) & National Organization on Disability (NOD) Award. Greenville County Library System was selected for its extensive work in creating “Intentional Strides,” which increased programs, library services and staff awareness of serving individuals with disabilities and special needs in Greenville County, S.C. The library also dedicated funds from its operating budget specifically to enhance and improve library programs, services and staff awareness with regard to patrons with disabilities. The award consists of $1,000 and a citation supported by Kay and David Holloman of Keystone Systems, developer of the Keystone Library Automation System (KLAS), and the National Organization on Disability.
The Francis Joseph Campbell Award winner is Chris Mundy, quality assurance specialist, Multistate Center East, National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), Library of Congress. He was selected for sharing his technical expertise in the production of quality audio materials through workshops, developing guidelines and consulting with the NLS volunteer recording studios. His contributions enhance and expand collections that offer a wide variety of reading materials to blind and visually impaired patrons. Mundy will receive a citation and a medal. Visit the Royal National College for the Blind website to read more about Francis Joseph Campbell, for whom this award is named.
Mary Beth Riedner, volunteer at the Gail Borden Public Library District, will receive ASCLA’s Exceptional Service Award. She is recognized for the development of “Tales and Travel,” a creative and innovative book-related program, website and video that trains volunteers in libraries and memory care centers to provide recreational reading to individuals with dementia. Her outstanding work will enrich the lives of people with Alzheimer’s for years to come. Riedner will receive a citation.Annual Conference attendees employed or interested in these areas—state library agencies; networks, cooperatives and consortia; specialized libraries such as those for the blind, deaf, hard of hearing and incarcerated populations; and independent librarians and library consultants—are encouraged to join the party and meet other professionals.

For More Exclusively ASCLA ALA Annual Conference Information

Locations are subject to change. Please check the event scheduler prior to the events.