Ring reads to the blind!

On education technology, college lobbyists are keeping disabled students behind

Electronic educational materials must be accessible to those with disabilities

Read all about it! 

ASCLA is now accepting nominations for its 2015 awards! 

Each year, ASCLA offers five awards honoring professional achievement in the areas of work represented by our diverse membership.

Projects focused on library services to people with disabilities: The ASCLA/KLAS/NOD Award, sponsored by ASCLA, the National Organization on Disability (NOD) and Keystone Systems, Inc. This award recognizes an innovative and well-organized project that successfully developed or expanded services for people with disabilities. The award can be for a specific service(s) program or for a library that has made its total services more accessible through changing physical and/or attitudinal barriers. The winner receives $1,000* and a citation provided by Keystone Systems, Inc. Download the award nomination form.

Outstanding contributions to the advancement of library service for the blind and physically handicapped: The Francis Joseph Campbell Award honors a person or institution for significant contributions in this field of service with a medal and a citation. Contributions include but are not limited to: an imaginative and constructive program in a particular library; a recognized contribution to the national library program for blind persons; creative participation in library associations or organizations that advance reading for the blind; a significant publication or writing in the field; or imaginative contribution to library administration, reference, circulation, selection, acquisitions, or technical services. The award is administered by the Libraries Serving Special Populations Section (LSSPS) of ASCLA, and is supported by Keystone Systems, Inc. Download the award nomination form.

Extension and Outreach Services: The ASCLA Exceptional Service Award recognizes exceptional service to patients in a medical facility, to persons who are homebound, to inmates, to older adults and to adults with a physical or mental disability who live in group homes or residences, as well as to recognize professional leadership, effective interpretation of programs, pioneering activity and significant research. The recipient receives a citation. Download the award nomination form.

Cooperative, Consulting and State Library Services: The ASCLA Leadership and Professional Achievement Award is a citation presented to one or more ASCLA members exemplifying leadership and achievement in the following areas: consulting, library cooperation, networking, statewide service and programs and state library development. Download the award nomination form.

Service to ASCLA: The Cathleen Bourdon Service Award is a citation presented to an ASCLA personal member for exceptional service and sustained leadership to the division. This includes participation in activities that have enhanced the stature, reputation and overall strength of ASCLA and have also cultivated the division’s relationship with other appropriate organizations, institutions or governmental agencies. Download the award nomination form.

Those interested in submitting a nomination can download the appropriate award nomination form (s) from the awards section of the ASCLA website Nominations for all awards must be received by Feb. 8, 2015. Submission information is included on each form.

*Monetary award amounts are subject to change without notice and are contingent upon donor funding supplied at the time the award is presented. Questions about these awards should be directed to the committee chairperson, Linda S. Lyshol (lindal@firstcitylibraries.org) or to Marianne Braverman, ASCLA Marketing & Programs Manager (mbraverman@ala.org).

ASCLA, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), is a diverse organization of librarians and support staff who work in academic and public libraries, state agencies, specialized libraries and multi-type cooperatives, as well as those who are self-employed. Not an ASCLA member, but interested in discounted registration rates on conference, ASCLA preconferences and other ASCLA events? Join, renew or add ASCLA to your ALA membership at www.ala.org/membership.

New Online Courses!

Check out the new online courses!
Buzz e-learning – Register now! -
http://eepurl.com/2jPEP

Travel with ASCLA to France and Italy this October!

Say au revoir to the gloomy fall weather and bonjour to lavender fields, vineyards and outdoor markets! Destinations for this Mediterranean adventure include Nice, Cannes and Monte Carlo. This is a fundraising trip hosted by ASCLA, a division of ALA. Previous adventures include Spain, France, Ireland and Italy.

A complete travel itinerary and instructions for reserving your spot are included in this downloadable flyer.
Deposits must be paid by August 1, 2014 to reserve your seat, and space is limited!

This adventure is open to the library community; there are no membership requirements in order to participate. Previous travelers have brought spouses, siblings and friends along.

To reserve your spot, you can download the application form here or make your reservation by contacting Michael Stillwell at Lyceum Tours (lyceum46@yahoo.com). You can also contact ASCLA Executive Director Susan Hornung (shornung@ala.org) for information.

New online courses and webinars!

Online Courses:

**Going to Jail: How Juvenile Books Portray the Prison Experience

October 20 – November 23, 2014, (Five live course chat meetings Thursdays 1:00 – 2:00pm CST)
This five week course will explore portrayals of the incarceration experience in juvenile and young adult literature. Read more.
Register now! **CEUs are available for this course! 

Webinars 

Emotional Intelligence in Your Workplace 

Wednesdays, July 23, 30, and August 6, 2:00 PM CST

In this 3-part series, we’ll discuss the idea of Emotional Intelligence and why interest in the field is increasing. Read more. Register now!

Portal, Platform, Public Option: An introduction and overview of the Digital Public Library of America, (DPLA) 
Wednesday, September 24, 2014, 2:00 p.m. CST

This presentation explores how we view the DPLA: as a portal, a technical platform, and an advocate for the public good. Read more. Register now!

Libraries Support Digital Readiness with Tech Training, STEM Programs, More Robust Online Collections

Leading Role Recognized in Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

Nearly 100 percent of America’s public libraries offer workforce development training programs, online job resources, and technology skills training, according to a new study from the American Library Association (ALA). Combined with maker spaces, coding classes, and programs dedicated to entrepreneurship and small business development, libraries are equipping U.S. communities with the resources and skills needed to succeed in today’s – and tomorrow’s – global marketplace.

President Obama and Congress recently acknowledged the vital contributions of libraries by enabling them—for the first time—to be considered One-Stop partners and eligible for federal funding to support job training and job search programs. The bipartisan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act also authorizes adult education and literacy activities provided by public libraries as an allowable statewide employment and training activity.

“Senator Jack Reed and I led the effort to include public libraries in this important new law because they are often the first places Americans go for skill development and job search assistance,” said Representative Rush Holt (D-NJ). “I’ve seen this firsthand with NJWorks@yourlibraryproject, which used federal Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) funding to help get job seekers back to work with access to online job resources and training in every community in New Jersey.”
Overall, libraries report technology improvements—including nearly ubiquitous public wi-fi, growing mobile resources and a leap in e-book access—but the ALA’s 2014 Digital Inclusion Survey also documents digital differences among states and an urban/rural divide.

“Until the Digital Inclusion Survey, no national study has shown in such detail the extent to which libraries complete education, jumpstart employment and entrepreneurship, and foster individual empowerment and engagement, or the E’s of Libraries™,” said ALA President Courtney Young. “The study also begins to map new programs and technology resources that range from STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) maker programming to 3D printing to hackathons.”

Among the study findings:
*98% of libraries provide free public access to Wi-Fi, up from 89% in 2012;
*98% provide technology training, ranging from internet safety and privacy to coding to using social media;
*98% provide assistance completing online government forms;
*97% provide online homework help;
*95% offer workforce development training programs;
*90% offer e-books, up from 76% in 2012;
*56% offer health and wellness programs regarding developing healthy lifestyles;
*50% offer entrepreneurship and small business development programs; and
*Average number of computers provided by libraries is now 20, up from 16 in 2012

“Changes in technology—whether internet speeds, or new devices or new applications—are racing faster all the time,” said IMLS Director Susan Hildreth. “Libraries are ideally positioned to help everyone in our communities get up to speed. This is the heart of digital inclusion—equitable access to internet-connected devices and online content plus the skills to take advantage of the educational, economic and social opportunities available through these technologies.”

Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and managed by the ALA Office for Research & Statistics and the Information Policy and Access Center at the University of Maryland, the Digital Inclusion Study provides national- and state-level data. The International City/County Management Association and ALA Office for Information Technology Policy are partners in the research effort.

While most libraries marked progress from the last national library technology study in 2012, advances are uneven. Less than half of rural libraries reported they increased bandwidth speeds in the last 24 months, compared with 64 percent of urban libraries and 56 percent of suburban libraries. Fewer than two-thirds of rural libraries report having access to information technology (IT) staff, far behind their counterparts. A vast majority of all libraries (66 percent), though, agree they would like to increase their broadband capacity, and that cost is the leading barrier to doing so.

“It is increasingly understood that access to broadband is the critical success factor across our society, and we must do more to connect all of our communities,” said ICMA Executive Director Robert J. O’Neill, Jr. “Libraries play an essential role in helping local governments meet their greatest challenges by connecting their services to critical community priorities.”

The study provides a first national look at emerging trends, from STEM maker spaces (17 percent, or about 3,000 libraries), to wireless printing (33 percent) to 3D printers and hosting hackathons or other coding/application development events (about 2 percent each, or roughly 260 libraries). Creation and making activities already are transforming what is possible for communities through libraries. At the Johnson County Library in Kansas, for instance, a library patron printed a mechanical hand for a family friend. High school student Mason Wilde loaded needed blueprints onto library computers and used the library’s 3D printer to create the necessary parts. Wilde then decided to start a nonprofit to make 3D prosthetics for other children, and he is now considering a career in the biomedical field.

“Creating is becoming a new digital competency, and libraries are building and expanding their programs and services to meet these changing community needs,” said Ann Joslin, President of the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies. Joslin also is the state librarian in Idaho, which currently has a pilot program underway to support library maker activities and encourage the use of new technologies and tools.

“Whether it’s a class on internet safety, an entrepreneur who identifies potential customers from databases or a class on digital content creation, libraries continue to establish themselves as digital leaders in communities,” Young concluded. “This study demonstrates how technology investments benefit our libraries and our patrons, and keep our communities thriving.”

Methodology: The Digital Inclusion Survey collected data from a nationally representative sample of public libraries at the branch/outlet level between September 3 and November 30, 2013. The survey was open to all public libraries to participate. However, the analysis conducted used only sampled libraries. The survey received 3,392 responses, for a 70.1 percent response rate. For more information, please visit http://www.ala.org/research/digitalinclusion and http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/. Past related reports on public library technology are available at www.ala.org/plinternetfunding.

ASCLA seeks online course and webinar proposals through September 1, 2015

ASCLA encourages subject matter experts and experienced librarians to submit proposals for ASCLA webinars to be presented October 2014 through August 2015. 

Proposals must be submitted by September 1, 2014 for presentation October 2014 through August 2015. Online courses and webinars submitted during this open call period will be reviewed and approved by September 15, 2014.

ASCLA welcomes proposals on topics that will assist our diverse membership in improved service delivery and job performance. ASCLA’s members represent libraries serving special populations, including library users with disabilities, and adults and youth who are incarcerated or detained; independent librarians and consultants; state library agencies and their employees, public libraries serving or working with the previously cited populations and institutions; and library networks and cooperatives. Staff of these libraries and agencies include librarians, library paraprofessionals, and library support staff.

The online course proposal form can be accessed here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/asclaonlinecourse2015

Attendees are charged a fee to participate in the course and receive a certificate upon completion. The fee includes ongoing access to an archived version of the course. Instructors will be paid a one-time course/curriculum development fee of $1,000 to set up the course initially, and $40 per participant thereafter.

The webinar proposal form can be accessed here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/asclawebinar2015 .
Webinar presenters will be paid $150 for each webinar presented and will receive training and support for Adobe Connect, the webinar technology platform used by the division. Webinars are generally 1-1 ½ hours long.

Proposal topics for online learning and webinars may include, but are not limited to the following:

  • ADA updates for libraries
  • Adult programming in a correctional library
  • Basics of a good prison/jail library
  • Best practices in correctional librarianship and providing services to the incarcerated
  • Consulting: marketing your services
  • Demonstration and review of current accessibility products
  • Ebooks
  • Emerging technologies in accessibility products and services, including screen readers, mobile devices, IPADS, etc.
  • Evaluating and improving cooperative services;
  • Future trends in library service;
  • Grants: best practices for finding funding and writing proposals
  • Group purchasing best practices
  • Hiring library consultants: best practices
  • How to be a futurist
  • Marketing library services to people with disabilities
  • Marketing on a shoestring budget
  • New apps that assist library users with special needs
  • Providing library services to people with cognitive or mental impairments
  • Review of best practices, standards and guidelines to improve library services
  • Technology trends for people with disabilities

Questions about submissions or about ASCLA’s online learning and webinar programs may be sent to Andrea Hill, ASCLA web manager and online learning liaison at ahill@ala.org.

ASCLA Seeks Editor for Online Membership Journal: Interface

The Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) seeks an editor for its quarterly online membership journal InterfaceInterface serves as a critically-important source of information and communication, reaching ASCLA’s 800 members each quarter and sharing news and best practices in ASCLA’s areas of interest with the larger library and user community.  Guided by ASCLA editorial policy, the editor is responsible for the content, format, and timely publication of Interface.

Applicants should have a strong overall knowledge of the association and its goals and have an interest in and knowledge of issues relevant to ASCLA members.  Applicants must have written and published articles and/or have demonstrated editorial experience.  Preferred applicants will have experience or familiarity with the technical and editorial issues associated with electronic and Web publishing.

Compensation of up to $1,000 annually will be provided to the Interface editor to cover travel to ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meeting.   The editor also receives complimentary registration for both conferences and VIP early registration for hotels.

The two-year appointment as Interface editor will begin upon appointment and end at the conclusion of the Annual Conference in 2016.  The term is renewable upon approval of the ASCLA Board. 

The deadline for application is July 10, 2014. It is anticipated a candidate will be selected by mid-August.  

Applicants should email a resume and cover letter summarizing their editorial philosophy, two to four samples of written work or editorial activities, and contact information for two professional references to Susan Hornung, ASCLA Executive Director: shornung@ala.org.

A division of the American Library Association, ASCLA enhances the effectiveness of library service by providing networking, enrichment and educational opportunities for its diverse members, who represent state library agencies, libraries serving special populations, consortia, and consultants. ASCLA is a division of the American Library Association. For more information, visit www.ala.org/ascla.

Job Description: ASCLA Interface Editor

 

Reports to Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) Board 
Term 2-year appointment, from the end of ALA 2014 Annual Conference through 2016 Annual Conference. The Editor is appointed by the ASCLA Board; the term is renewable upon approval of the Board. The Editor must be a member of ASCLA. 
Summary of Position
  • Interface is the official newsletter of the ASCLA. It supports effective communication by reporting official acts and activities of the units of ASCLA, disseminating substantive articles and special focus issues on latest developments in the fields of interest to ASCLA members, and serving as a communication channel to the broader library and user community.
  • Guided by the editorial policy approved by the ASCLA Board, the editor is responsible for the content, format, and timely publication of Interface and prepares an annual plan indicating topics to be addressed in quarterly issues.
  • The Publications Committee serves in an advisory capacity to the editor and develops guidelines to assist the editor.

 

Specific Responsibilities
  • Establish the annual schedule in consultation with the ASCLA Executive Director and share content deadlines with the ASCLA President and members of the Board, committee chairs, and interest group leaders.
  • Establish a theme for each quarterly issue of Interface, based on regular communication with ASCLA members, section leaders, Board, committees, and staff, breaking news, and activities of interest.
  • Invite articles related to the theme, through personal invitation to a few key authors and through general announcement using the ASCLA listservs and others as appropriate.
  • Gather articles for quarterly publication.
  • Collect signed copyright release forms from each author.
  • Work closely with the ASCLA office to incorporate articles submitted by staff.
  • Edit articles for content, style, and correct grammatical usage, consulting with other experts as needed. The ASCLA Publications Committee serves as an unofficial editorial board, and section leaders and ASCLA Board members are always willing to provide advice and counsel in their areas of expertise.
  • Prepare each issue for posting to the ASCLA website and submit files via e-mail to the ASCLA office.
  • Attend ASCLA Board meetings at ALA Annual Conference and Midwinter Meetings as non-voting ex-officio member, and attend as many interest group and committee meetings, programs, and other ASCLA-related events as possible.
  • Periodically survey members to determine their satisfaction with Interface and elicit ideas for improvement.
  • Occasionally handle requests for republication and resolve problems.

 

Honoraria ASCLA contributes $1,000 per year to help offset the conference expenses of the Interface editor. In addition the Interface editor receives complimentary registration for both conferences and VIP early registration for hotels.

 

 

IFLA Manifesto for libraries serving persons with a print disability

To improve and promote accessible library and information services to persons with a visual impairment or any other print disability

Lack of access to information is the biggest barrier for persons with a print disability to fully and effectively participate in all aspects of society.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (esp. art. 9, 21 and 24) states that print disabled people have the right to equal access to books, knowledge and information at the same time, cost and quality as everyone else.

There are over 161 million blind and partially sighted people in the world and this number is growing. There are even more people with other print disabilities who cannot effectively read print because of a physical, perceptual, developmental, cognitive, or learning disability. Together this makes up a very large number of people who cannot read a conventional book, magazine or website. Less than 5% of all published materials and reportedly less than 20% of websites are accessible to this target group.

Libraries are a community’s ‘portal’ to information, knowledge and leisure, and their services need to be made accessible for all. Content and technology providers are essential partners in developing these inclusive information and leisure reading services. They should do so by making good use of the emerging possibilities of digitised publishing and delivery.

Statements

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) promotes the right of people with a print disability to equitable access to all library and information services and supports international and territorial legislation that fights disability discrimination

  1. IFLA recommends that all library and information providers, as part of their core services, put in place services, collections, equipment and facilities, which will assist individual users with a print disability to access and use resources that meet their particular needs for information.
  2. IFLA encourages library and information service providers to consult individuals with a disability, and groups representing them, in the planning, development and ongoing delivery of services.
  3. IFLA acknowledges that the best services are provided by professionals who are aware of the needs of, and service options for, people with a print disability. Therefore IFLA encourages all library and information services to ensure that staff are adequately trained and available to work with users with a print disability, and supports career-long professional development and formal library and information studies programs, which will facilitate the strengthening of equitable library and information services to people with a print disability.
  4. IFLA supports efforts to improve access to resources by people with a print disability through service agreements, referrals and sharing of resources between library and information services; and between these and other organisations specialising in services targeted for people with a print disability.

Therefore IFLA encourages the establishment and development of an international network of libraries of accessible materials.

  1. IFLA supports efforts to ensure that copyright legislation enables equal access by people with a print disability to information from all libraries and information providers
  2. In addition to meeting legislative requirements, IFLA encourages the observation of universal design principles, guidelines and standards to ensure that library and information services, collections, technologies, equipment and facilities meet the identified needs of users with a print disability.

Implementing

To promote the implementation of the statements in this document, IFLA encourages:

  • Decision makers at international, national and local levels to continuously develop and execute action plans for library and information services to persons with a print disability
  • Decision makers at international, national and local levels to include in their action plans mechanisms for (self) monitoring the progress made on the implementation
  • All funding bodies to adequately resource library and information services for persons with a print disability

Endorsed by the IFLA Governing Board April 2012

ASCLA President’s Program at ALA Annual Conference 2014!

Connected Learning and Libraries: At the Intersection of the Arts, Media, New Technologies, and Informal Learning.

Sunday, June 29, 10:30am – 12:00pm, Las Vegas Convention Center, Rooms N255/257

Connected Learning is an exciting educational approach that is attracting increasing attention from educators, librarians, foundations, and governments. It makes learning relevant to all populations, to real life and real work, and to the realities of the digital age where the demand for learning never stops. Join Kylie Peppler, Advisor to the Connected Learning Research Network, to learn more about the connected learning approach, underlying research, and how it can be successfully leveraged in the design of library spaces and programming targeted at today’s youth.

Speaker: Kylie Peppler, Assistant Professor, Learning Sciences Program, Indiana University, Bloomington

Kylie Peppler, an artist by training, engages in research that focuses on the intersection of arts, media, new technologies, and informal learning. Currently, Peppler’s work examines the media arts practices of urban and rural youth and youth with disabilities in order to support literacy, learning, and the arts in the 21st Century. An Advisor for the Connected Learning Research Network, Peppler has also conducted research on media arts in youth communities for the National Science Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Initiative.

Free to all conference registrants

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